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1830s Child's dress

This is for my blogger friends (Sarah Jane!) who are in love with the 1830s. Can you imagine dressing a daughter/niece/grandaughter in this? And it's an original, I believe. I found the photos while clicking through Googles regarding dollmaking. Click here for the blog with more photos and description of the dress. Its enough to make me enamored with the 1830s!

From the blog:
Emma is wearing a beautiful late 1830's dress of super thin tissue silk in a multi color blue stripe. The height of the huge full gigot sleeves was 1835-6, after this, they began to deflate, in the form of the fullness being tamed down in the form of pleats~ 1837 the pleats at the top of the arm, and gradually made their way down, 1838 sleeves banded down to the elbow, until just an awkward poof remained at the fore-arm, and by 1839-40, sleeves were tight as a second skin with the armscye seam waaaaay up under the armpit, usually making for a horizontal stress fold as seen in pictures of the era~ anyways, looking at unaltered sleeves are a good way of dating. This dress has matching lined pelerine as well.



9 comments:

Mrs. G said...

All I can say is Wow! I really love it. I'd *love* for my little girls to look like that. :-)

Robin's Egg Bleu said...

That's from Diamond K Folkart, Rachel Kinnison's blog. It's fabulous, and she has a treasure trove museum quality collection of rare and early garments. She's a fabulous doll maker as well, check out her blog.

Lauren said...

That is darling. What a gorgeous gown! Thanks for sharing the pics.

Amy said...

Yes, the dolls are stunning! I'm trying to get into doll making and just don't know where to start. I was thinking polymer clay.

AlohaAroha said...

It's adorable, but the fact that it is a historical dress on a real person just makes me cringe. ((shudder)). Make a reproduction and preserve the original so it can be used for research please!

Amy said...

Aloha - I feel the same way. I much prefer historical garments to be in tissue for research. On the other hand, it's really nice to see what the original garment looks like on a person. It's so difficult these days to get fabric and a fit that truly mimics the original. So, for me, being able to see how an original fits and drapes on a live human being (rather than a stiff mannequin) is immensely helpful.

Sarah Jane said...

Oh my goodness!! I rarely see original childs dresses, especially from this era which I particularly love (later 1830's when the sleeves started to loose the puff at the top). How beautiful!! And her little cap too. ..just sweet. Although I too feel a bit horrified at having an original on a little girl, but she looks like she was quite careful of it. And it fits her like a dream.

Rachael Kinnison said...

I am pleased you like this gown on my Emma, it is one of my favorites. I was unaware of your post using my photos, or would have commented earlier. I would like to add, that all of the clothing here is stored archivally, in a climate and light controlled environment. My girls know how to treat the early textiles, and have the utmost respect for them...and on the rare occasion, that they become the correct size to fit into something I have, that has not been photographed yet, they are extremely sensitive~ Emma is the best, she will only move where and when I tell her to, and of coarse all the clothing is worn over correct period undergarments as well. It is my pleasure, and responsibility to make sure the items in my charge, are here for many many more generations to enjoy.
Kindest, rachael kinnison, Lady's Repository Museum

Amy said...

Hello Rachel! Thanks for commenting. I could tell by your site that you obviously took great pains to be gentle with the clothes. Just by looking at your daughter wearing this one, one can tell she probably doesn't go running around the house in it. :) As a maker of historical clothes, I just LOVE seeing real historical clothes on people, especially with the right undergarments, because it does so much more for us research-wise than any CDV or picture of the garment flat on tissue would do. And, now that I have a little girl, I would love to make her a dress like this.

Thank you for your site! The dolls (and the dresses) are just fabulous.

Amy